Blog Posts Media Science Media Issues & Politics Why we should teach kids how to code

Why we should teach kids how to code

Learning to code will teach our kids how to think.

We should teach kids how to code.

Growing up in Sweden, we learnt English as our second language.

We also had a third language and we got to choose between German and French.

I chose German for no obvious reason at the time, but years later I ended up living in Munich where I sure made good use of my stellar beer-ordering-skills.

That was then.
Today is now.

Today, there should be another language to consider.

Why we should teach kids how to code

Here’s how I see it:

Code is poetry. It’s many languages with many different dialects. It’s diverse and in constant flux. And coders are pushing its boundaries to use the language creatively.

Just like a “normal” language.

Code is also a universal Esperanto that allows anyone with an internet connection to convey ideas across borders.

If I’m lucky enough to have kids some day, I will definitely teach them how to code.

It allows you to build whole universes from your mind.
It allows you to make your voice heard across borders.
It teaches you how to think.

And we can do better here, I think. Our kids could all learn code. And all schools could teach kids how to code.

You don’t have to be a genius to read.
So, why should you have to be a genius to code?

Learn more: Go check out code.org.

Photo by Fotis Fotopoulos on Unsplash.

Avatar of Jerry Silfwer
Jerry Silfwerhttps://doctorspin.org/
Jerry Silfwer aka Doctor Spin is an awarded senior adviser specialising in public relations and digital strategy. Based in Stockholm, Sweden.

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